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Mindfulness-Based Stress Courses UK 2014


Mindfulness 2014

Start Your Year Bright and Clear

Book Now

 Breathworks Mindfulness for Health Liverpool, 2014.  8 sessions: October 28th, Nov 4th & 11th & 18th & 25th, Dec 2nd & 9th & 16th

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Mindfulness for Health endorsed by Jon Kabat-Zinn: "The Breathworks approach to Mindfulness-Based Pain Management (MBPM) is the most comprehensive, in-depth, scientifically up-to-date and user-friendly approach to learning the how of living with chronic pain and reclaiming one's life that I know of".

 
Breathworks Mindfulness for Stress Course Liverpool 2014 (4 Saturday Sessions: May 24th, June 7th, June 22nd (10-2), June 28th (10-5pm)

Breathworks Mindfulness for Stress Course Liverpool 2014 (4 Saturday Sessions: Sept 6th, 20th, October 4th (10-2), October 18th (10-5pm)

Making Your Practice Sustainable - Secular-based Mindfulness Sessions Drop In Liverpool. 90 minute sessions which help you to learn and deepen mindfulness-based practices and techniques - donation based

Saturday March 15th (3-4.30pm)   Saturday March 29th (3-4.30pm)     Saturday April 12th (3-4.30pm)
Saturday April 26th (6.00-7.30)     Saturday May 24th     (3-4.30pm)    Saturday June 7th (3-4.30pm) 
Saturday June 22nd    (3-4.30pm)   Saturday June 28th (6.00-7.30)

Kindness and Self-Compassion Workshop Liverpool, Part 1, May 25th (10am-1) @ The Greenbank Sports Academy, Liverpool 17. L17 1AR. £30.00, £20.00 concessions)

Kindness and Self-Compassion Workshop Liverpool, Part 2, June 29th (10am-1)
@ The Greenbank Sports Academy, Liverpool 17. L17 1AR. £30.00, £20.00 concessions)

Refresher Day Liverpool 
(for those who have attended Breathworks Mindfulness for Stress Course, workshops or taster days), Liverpool June 29th (2.30-5.30) £25.00, £15.00 concessions


If you'd like to arrange a taster session or talk on the subject of mindfulness for your organisation, please get in touch.

Breathworks courses (Mindfulness for Stress and Mindulness for Health) are recognised by the major mindfulness-based training organisations. Completing a Breathworks course is a recognised first step to becoming a mindfulness trainer. Mindfulnet.org http://mindfulnet.org/page16.htm offers guidance to help you select the right teacher and course, helping you to get the most out of your mindfulness training.

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Mindfulness-Based Approaches

Jon Kabat-Zinn defines mindfulness as

'paying attention in a particular way; on purpose, in the present moment,
and nonjudgmentally'.

Mindfulness can help us to become more aware of how our mind works, more aware of our thoughts and feelings so that instead of being overwhelmed by them we’re better able to manage them. Being present in this way enables us to make more considered and appropriate choices about how we want to live our lives, to respond instead of react and to meet challenges more skilfully. With mindfulness we can learn to meet ourselves and our lives with openness and acceptance instead of criticism and dissatisfaction. Learning to be kinder to ourselves we improve the quality of our life and develop a powerful antidote to stress. 

 With mindfulness we can: 

  • reduce stress levels
  • learn to respond more skilfully to life’s challenges
  • be present for our life as it happens

 

Mindfulness training can help restore a sense of:

 

  • perspective
  • balance between ‘doing’ and ‘being’
  • spaciousness in our thinking and emotions


Mindfulness training is an investment in:

  • a sense of peace and ease
  • our mental, emotional and spiritual health
  • our human potential

 

 

 Can Mindfulness Help Me?

 

Breathworks specialises in running secular mindfulness-based courses which help and empower people who suffer from:

 

  • stress, anxiety (feeling unable to stop or slow down)
  • critical or negative thoughts, low self-esteem
  • phobias or feelings of panic
  • low mood, feelings of hopelessness or depression
  • addiction or eating disorders
  • difficulty relaxing, sleeping or concentrating
  • illness or pain

 

But you don’t have to be ill or stressed to benefit from mindfulness. Mindfulness training provides us with practices which we can integrate into our daily life which help us to take care of our mental, emotional and physical wellbeing. Mindfulness training provides us with a long term health plan. Mindfulness training can benefit school children, students, pregnant women, in fact anyone at any time in their lives. It is never too late or too early to begin. Breathworks courses also support those caring for others and professionals working in healthcare and education.

You do not need to have any experience of meditation to take part in mindfulness-based courses. All activities and practices are taught within a supportive group environment.

 

Two very useful videos to watch:

Understanding Mindfulness 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPuTqDl99qM&feature=player_embedded#t=42

Mark Williams (Oxford University) The benefits of Mindfulness 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=CyiwVwwjFtQ

 

 Why Mindfulness?

 

There are many factors that contribute to feelings of stress and overwhelm; the pace of life, the relentless stimulation from mobile phones, computers, TV; the demands placed on our time by work, family and relationships. Time, it seems, is always running out, and though we work harder we just can’t seem to get on top of everything. Doing more things faster might appear to be the solution but this only causes more stress. Living at this pace with this pressure is draining, and eventually we begin to experience symptoms of stress; loss of temper, anxiety, feelings of fear, panic, loss of appetite, difficulties relaxing, switching off, sleeping. To compound these problems, many us spend a lot of time living in our heads, planning, analysing, and worrying about the future and what might happen. Or we spend a lot of time in the past going over what we should or could have done. This kind of thinking adds to feelings of stress and dissatisfaction, and while we’re living in the past or the future we miss our lives as they happen right now, in this moment.

 

Living in a time so characterised by consumerism it’s easy to slip into thinking that whatever we’ve got isn’t enough because there’s always something better, newer, faster that we might have; easy to slip into thinking that whatever we achieve isn’t enough because there’s always another goal to set and target to reach. We might begin to believe that who we are isn’t enough because we could be richer, slimmer, smarter, younger, fitter. Thinking like this is exhausting, demoralising and erodes our sense of ease.

 

More generally we may experience the world as a dangerous place, our societies’ lurching from one political crisis to another, catastrophe around every corner. We watch conflict, environmental damage, injustice and inhumanity unfold on TV and feel helpless because we don’t know how to change these things. We used to exercise our personal power to a degree by voting and perhaps hoped that politicians could sort things out. Increasingly it appears that politics isn’t enough and that politicians are unable to manage a world now shaped by powerful global economic forces. Profit appears to be more important than the welfare of individuals or communities, and there appears to be a general lack of care for both people and for the planet on which we live. Fear for our future and wellbeing provides a background for our personal stress. Thinking characterised by fear, anxiety and dissatisfaction erodes our sense of hope and undermines our personal power and our sense of human potential.

 

Though many of us have most of our basic needs met (food, shelter, health care) and more possessions than ever before, there is still a sense of deep dissatisfaction, a sense that there is something missing; that the way we live is out of balance. There is also a feeling that we’ve lost perspective, lost sight of the things that matter most to us, feeling safe, feeling content with what we have, feeling at peace. There is a sense that we no longer have time to nurture our human capacity to love, to care for ourselves, to care for others, to just be ourselves. There is a longing, a thirst for something more than what’s on offer.

 

We don’t have to wait for someone else to change things for us or for someone else to make us happy. Change starts with you, and you already have all the resources you need to live with less stress and fear and with more ease and a greater sense of creativity and possibility. Jon Kabat-Zinn describes mindfulness as ‘participatory medicine’, a process of healing in which you can reorientate your mind, your heart and your life towards deep and peaceful change. Mindfulness offers a structure which can support you to make the changes you want to make in yourself and in the way you live.